Ava Jae

Obsessive writer. Insatiable reader. Perfectionistic Artist.

It’s Tuesday vlog time! Being a writer isn’t easy, but here are five ways to help you improve your skills. 

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AWESOME INDUSTRY BLOGS: 

shadowcon asked: Have you seen Buffy the Vampire Slayer? What do you think of it?

I haven’t seen Buffy, actually. So…yep… *eyes Netflix and Hulu queue* 

bookphile:

If your only problem with certain books is the age group for which they are meant for than I feel bad for you because you’re missing out on some amazing stories. And if you aren’t reading for the story, then what’s the point?

(via bethrevis)

bethrevis:

chirotus:

constant-instigator:

ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

Oh wow! I’ve been wanting this for ages!

This needs to be in every history book along with a map showing where those nations have been pushed to now.

Reblogging in “honor” of Columbus Day…

bethrevis:

chirotus:

constant-instigator:

ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

Oh wow! I’ve been wanting this for ages!

This needs to be in every history book along with a map showing where those nations have been pushed to now.

Reblogging in “honor” of Columbus Day…

thecompanionsdoctor:

thecompanionsdoctor:

The thing that sucks about mental illness is that if you aren’t depressed enough, suicidal enough, bad enough, nobody cares. Nobody cares until you reach their standard, and that standard is when your problem is bad enough to effect them

The amount of people who can relate to this makes me equally incredibly sad and immensely angry

(via disabilityinkidlit)

sarahreesbrennan:

malindalo:

I went on a bit of a twitter rant yesterday after reading one too many trade reviews in which a book’s diverse cast was dismissed as implausible. Charles Tan was kind enough to storify the whole thing here.

Beautiful! Why aren’t writers of all-white all-straight dude-centric stories criticised for their agendas and lack of realism? (I mean, just kidding, we all know why.)

sarahreesbrennan:

malindalo:

I went on a bit of a twitter rant yesterday after reading one too many trade reviews in which a book’s diverse cast was dismissed as implausible. Charles Tan was kind enough to storify the whole thing here.

Beautiful! Why aren’t writers of all-white all-straight dude-centric stories criticised for their agendas and lack of realism? (I mean, just kidding, we all know why.)

(via bethrevis)

Writability: Book Review: WE WERE HERE by Matt de la Peña

Wow. So I’m not really sure where to start with this one, so I guess I’ll start where I always start, with the Goodreads summary: 
“The story of one boy and his journey to find himself. 

When it happened, Miguel was sent to Juvi. The judge gave him a year in a group home—said he had to write in a journal so some counselor could try to figure out how he thinks. The judge had no idea that he actually did Miguel a favor. Ever since it happened, his mom can’t even look at him in the face. Any home besides his would be a better place to live. 

But Miguel didn’t bet on meeting Rondell or Mong or on any of what happened after they broke out. He only thought about Mexico and getting to the border to where he could start over. Forget his mom. Forget his brother. Forget himself. 

Life usually doesn’t work out how you think it will, though. And most of the time, running away is the quickest path right back to what you’re running from.”
I have to say, We Were Here by Matt de la Peña has to be one of the rawest books I’ve read in a while—and I loved it. Miguel’s voice comes through so clear, and it’s so different from any other YA voice I’ve read, and it really fits the tone of the novel perfectly
I’m going to give an example because I love it that much: 
“You know how when you’re a kid and you get a new bad-ass rubber football for Christmas, and the morning it takes a few minutes to remember why you’re so excited? It’s like that for me, only the opposite. When I wake up, everything’s normal for a while. I’m just plain Miguel. And then suddenly it hits me what I did. It punches me right in the ribs. It screams in my ears how everything isn’t normal anymore, it’s fucked.” —pg. 125.

I mean, wow, right?

We Were Here is written in a journal-like format, but Miguel makes a point of saying he’s not going to talk about feelings, he’s going to write exactly what happens to him. And so we learn about Mong and Rondell (who, I have to say, are extraordinarily memorable and interesting side characters), and how he ends up on the run, and the events that unfold as he and the guys are trying to get to Mexico, and the pacing is so on point—I was totally hooked from the beginning. Which is pretty great, because I don’t usually like diary/journal entry-type formats.

I could ramble about the many things I enjoyed about this book, but instead I’m going to recommend you guys check out this fabulous YA read for an example of incredible, raw voice alone (though that’s not the only thing to praise). I really enjoyed it, and I’m rating it a five out of five.

A NaNo Post to Get You Planning and Inspired

write-like-a-freak:

It always really annoys me when I see masterlists and all the links are just linked to other masterlists of links and it takes fifteen tabs to get to an actual article about whatever the question was, so all of these (unless stated otherwise on the link) lead to actual discussion of the topic, not just links.

Plotting:

Plotting and Developing Characters (Mine)

Ten Things You can Do in the Middles of Novels

Plot and Story Structure

A big post of plot stuff

Managing Multiple Plot Lines

How to Give Your Story a Purpose

Writing/Developing Characters:

A chart for figuring out how different MBTI personalities work together

Tabatha’s Guide to Creating a Character

Writing a Novel: Characters (Mine)

Writing Characters of Another Gender

Creating a Character from Scratch

Character Trait Chart

Inspiration for Characters:

Girls I Want to See in YA, part 2 (Mine)

Boys I Want to See in YA (Mine)

Character Generator

123 Ideas for Character Flaws

My Writing Inspiration Tag (Mine) 

I will possibly add more as I go

(via thewritershelpers)

Writing Process: Writing a Series

writing-questions-answered:

auhoraatra asked: Hi, I just need a little of guidance. I’m working on a fantasy novel that I hope to turn into a series one day. Problem - or should I say problems? - is that I have a good half of the world figured and a magic system, but as far as knowing the true main plot that all the other books will have is where I’m stuck. I dream of being published and I will never, ever give up on the story but I’m a sixteen year old girl and I’m wondering if I should finish writing this book and withhold publishing or?

The thought of being published is thrilling and wonderful, but you have plenty of time for that later. Right now you should focus on completing the novel and then figure out where the rest of the series is going. Does it even need to be a series? Or are you making it one just for the sake of writing a series? Unless you have a series arc and final destination in mind, you might consider whether it would be better off as a stand alone novel. Here are some good resources to help with the plotting if you decide to go ahead and do it as a series:

Here’s a good general article about plotting a series.

Also: Series Planning - Subplots and Plotlines

How to Write a Book Series

How to Write and Plan a Book Series

Whether you stick with a series or decide to make it a stand alone novel, you have a lot of work ahead of you before you put too much more thought into getting published. Getting published is hard, and the only way to make it happen is to put a lot of hard work into your novel. That means that once you finish your book, you need to read through it and revise it. And then read through it and revise it again. Then you need to find some test readers who you trust and who can be honest with you about what they liked and what they didn’t. Then you have to revise it again, and then you need to give it a final polish, where you go through line-by-line to look for errors and to make sure everything is just right. It’s a lot of work, and it can take years. But if you don’t do it, your odds of getting published are very, very slim. 

The good news, though, is that with each draft your writing will get better and better, so no matter how much time it takes, you’re working on your craft and growing as a writer.

Here’s a great article about all the steps it takes to create a novel, from the first spark of an idea all the way to querying.

If you need further help or just need some encouragement, you know where to find me! :) 

Also, here are some great tumblrs you should be following:

Query Quagmire

Jennifer Recommends

Write World

The Writers Helpers

FYeah Character Development

The Right Writing

Writing in the Blue (aggregate/re-blogs)

beanmom:

nospockdasgay:

redbloodedamerica:

mallninjacode:

pual1010:

brownglucose:

stunningpicture:

So proud of my mother for doing her own research after I sent her that meme. A sign she hung in her car window.

Stay woke

Is this true?

Not only is it true, it gets worse. The Susan G Komen For The Cure Foundation has actually successfully sued “competing” charities, because (paraphrasing) their “message or branding was infringing.”
You read that correctly: they took money that people had donated to cure cancer, and hired attorneys with it, to sue ANOTHER group of people trying to find a cure for cancer, who, in turn, had to us their donated money to hire their own legal counsel to defend themselves.



Yeah signal boost because not enough people know about this and seriously FUCK SUSAN G. KOMEN THEY ARE THE ACTUAL WORST

Some links…
http://thinkbeforeyoupink.org/
http://www.somethingawful.com/feature-articles/for-the-cure/
http://thestir.cafemom.com/in_the_news/132728/susan_g_komen_foundation_has
(reblogged in honor of my mother, who died of breast cancer, 11/13/97)

beanmom:

nospockdasgay:

redbloodedamerica:

mallninjacode:

pual1010:

brownglucose:

stunningpicture:

So proud of my mother for doing her own research after I sent her that meme. A sign she hung in her car window.

Stay woke

Is this true?

Not only is it true, it gets worse. The Susan G Komen For The Cure Foundation has actually successfully sued “competing” charities, because (paraphrasing) their “message or branding was infringing.”

You read that correctly: they took money that people had donated to cure cancer, and hired attorneys with it, to sue ANOTHER group of people trying to find a cure for cancer, who, in turn, had to us their donated money to hire their own legal counsel to defend themselves.

Yeah signal boost because not enough people know about this and seriously FUCK SUSAN G. KOMEN THEY ARE THE ACTUAL WORST

Some links…

http://thinkbeforeyoupink.org/

http://www.somethingawful.com/feature-articles/for-the-cure/

http://thestir.cafemom.com/in_the_news/132728/susan_g_komen_foundation_has

(reblogged in honor of my mother, who died of breast cancer, 11/13/97)

(via corinneduyvis)

delilahsdawson:

This philosophy applies to SO MUCH. 

Agents want to love your book. Hiring managers want you to be exactly the person they need. The person on the other end of that blind date is hoping beyond hope that you’re their huckleberry.

(Source: dailydormer, via bethrevis)